PowerShell, Bouncy Castle and Extended Key Usage

2013-04-17 12:46:44 +0000

Note: This is a bit long, because I want to take a moment to show some of the problems you might have using PowerShell to call .NET code that’s written in a certain style.

If you can’t be bothered, skip to the end, or the source code’s in the repository.

Overview

In the C# code, we had something like the following:

// Add the "Extended Key Usage" attribute, specifying "server authentication".
var usages = new[] { KeyPurposeID.IdKPServerAuth };
var extendedKeyUsage = new ExtendedKeyUsage(usages);
certificateGenerator.AddExtension(
    X509Extensions.ExtendedKeyUsage.Id,
    false,
    extendedKeyUsage);

This translates directly to PowerShell:

$usages = @( [Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID]::IdKPServerAuth )
$extendedKeyUsage =
	New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.ExtendedKeyUsage($usages)

…but we’d kinda like to allow the following:

$certificateGenerator | Add-ExtendedKeyUsage -Oid '1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1'

…or maybe…

$certificateGenerator | Add-ExtendedKeyUsage -ServerAuth

KeyPurposeID

PowerShell has a really cool feature where it’ll coerce a string into an enum value, but that’s no good to us here:

PS> [Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID] $usage = 'IdKPServerAuth'
Cannot convert the "IdKPServerAuth" value of type "System.String"
	to type "Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID".

…because KeyPurposeID isn’t a C#-style enum, it’s a Java-style enum class, where it contains static members with the appropriate values:

PS> [Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID].GetMembers() |
		where { $_.MemberType -eq 'Field' } | % { $_.Name }
AnyExtendedKeyUsage
IdKPServerAuth
IdKPClientAuth
...

Converting a string OID (doesn’t work)

So, how do we get from a string OID (‘1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1’) to a KeyPurposeID?

KeyPurposeID has no constructors:

PS> [Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID].GetConstructors().Count
0

KeyPurposeID is derived from DerObjectIdentifier:

PS> [Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID].BaseType.FullName
Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.DerObjectIdentifier

…which does have a constructor:

PS> [Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.DerObjectIdentifier].GetConstructors() | % { $_.ToString() }
Void .ctor(System.String)

Let’s try that:

PS> $oid = '1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1'
PS> $usage = New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID($oid)

New-Object : Constructor not found. Cannot find an appropriate constructor for type
Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID.

Nope.

Converting a string OID

OK. Let’s try something different:

PS> [Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.ExtendedKeyUsage].GetConstructors() | % { $_.ToString() }
Void .ctor(Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.KeyPurposeID[])
Void .ctor(System.Collections.ArrayList)
Void .ctor(System.Collections.IEnumerable)

Ah. No generics. So what is it expecting in that IEnumerable? Time to take a look at the source code

public ExtendedKeyUsage(IEnumerable usages)
{
	Asn1EncodableVector v = new Asn1EncodableVector();
	foreach (Asn1Object o in usages)
	{
		// ...

OK, so it wants Asn1Object instances. Well, we’re in luck because DerObjectIdentifier that we were looking at earlier is derived from Asn1Object. This means that we can do something like the following:

$oid = '1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1'
$usage = New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.DerObjectIdentifier($oid)
$usages =  @( $usages )
$extendedKeyUsage =
	New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.ExtendedKeyUsage($usages)

But, in our function, which starts like this…

function Add-ExtendedKeyUsage
{
[CmdletBinding()]
param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory = $true, ValueFromPipeline = $true)]
    [Org.BouncyCastle.X509.X509V3CertificateGenerator] $certificateGenerator,

    [Parameter(Position = 0, Mandatory = $false, ValueFromPipeline = $false)]
    [string[]] $Oid = $null
)

…we want something like the following:

$usages = $Oid | % { New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.DerObjectIdentifier($_) }
$extendedKeyUsage = New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.ExtendedKeyUsage($usages)

We convert our string array into an array of DerObjectIdentifier. Seems fairly simple, right? Doesn’t work:

New-Object : Cannot find an overload for "ExtendedKeyUsage" and the argument count: "1".

What’s happening here is that we have a DerObjectIdentifier[], and PowerShell can’t figure out which constructor to use. We need to either construct an ArrayList, or coerce this into an IEnumerable. We’ll try the IEnumerable first:

PS> $usages = $Oid | % { New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.DerObjectIdentifier($_) }
PS> $extendedKeyUsage =
		New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.ExtendedKeyUsage(
			[System.Collections.IEnumerable] $usages)
Cannot convert the "1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.1" value of type "Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.DerObjectIdentifier"
	to type "System.Collections.IEnumerable".

What’s happening here is that PowerShell likes to unwrap single-item arrays:

PS> $usages.GetType().IsArray
False

This answer is to add a comma. Yes, really. But, we also need to use an array of the correct type:

[Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.Asn1Object[]] $usages = @()
$Oid | % { $usages += New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.DerObjectIdentifier($_) }
$extendedKeyUsage = New-Object Org.BouncyCastle.Asn1.X509.ExtendedKeyUsage(,$usages)